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Collecting Your Judgment

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If the judgment debtor has not paid you the judgment debt when it is due – or made arrangements to pay you over time – California law gives you, the judgment creditor, a number of ways to collect AFTER the 30-day waiting period is over.


TIPS: As you go through this process: 


If you DO NOT KNOW the debtor’s assets – their value, their location, etc. --
among the things you can do are: 
 


NOTE 1:  There are Limits on Use of Examinations ordered by the court, and there are ways to locate the debtor, if you can’t find him or her.

NOTE 2:  The debtor has the right to ask the court to protect some types of wages or property from being used to pay a judgment debt, and you, the judgment creditor, have the right to object to the debtor’s request for an exemption.  Here's how to:


If you DO KNOW the debtor’s assets and the debtor is an individual, sole proprietor, or general partner, -- among the things you can do are:


If you DO KNOW the debtor’s assets and the debtor is a corporation or a limited liability company (LLC): 


Other court processes you may want to know:


The general process for collecting a judgment from a debtor is similar throughout California, but there may be some differences from one county to another.  For example, in many counties the Sheriff is the most commonly-used levying officer, while in other counties, someone else (like a Registered Process Server) might fill that role.  To find out what you must do in your county, contact the Small Claims Advisor. Opens new window 


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